Highest Mountain In The World

Highest Mountain In The World

A great many people definitely realize that the world’s most noteworthy mountain is Mount Everest. It’s regular learning, it’s standard, it’s a sorry mystery. Be that as it may, and how about we get genuine for a moment, what number of individuals do you think know what the world’s 6th most elevated mountain is? Or on the other hand, so far as that is concerned, what the third, fourth, fifth, seventh, eighth, and ninth most astounding mountains on the planet are. Precisely. That is the kind of random data just genuine mountaineering trendy people have. Gratefully, and huge shoutout to Google here for helping us in our hour of need, we would now be able to all be mountaineering fashionable people together. Information is control, control is learning and so on.

  1. Amphitheatre, Drakensberg

    Amphitheatre, Drakensberg

    The Drakensberg is the highest mountain range in Southern Africa, rising to 3,482 metres (11,420 ft) in height. The name is derived from the dutch and means “dragons mountain”. The Amphitheatre is one of the geographical features of the Northern Drakensberg, and is widely regarded as one of the most impressive cliff faces on earth. The Amphitheatre is over 5 kilometers (3 miles) in length and has precipitous cliffs rising approximately 1200 meters (4000 ft) along its entire length.

  2. Mount Hang

    Mount Huang

    Mount Huang is a mountain range in eastern China also known as Huangshan (“Yellow Mountain”). The area is well known for its scenery, sunsets, peculiarly-shaped granite peaks and views of the clouds from above. Mount Huang is a frequent subject of traditional Chinese paintings and literature, as well as modern photography. The tallest peak in the Huangshan mountain range is the Lotus Peak at 1,864 meters (6,115 ft). In ancient times almost 60,000 stone steps were carved into the side of the mountain. Today there are also cable cars that tourists can use to ride directly from the base to one of the summits.

  3. K2


    Who remembers the film Vertical Limit? It came out in the year 2000 and starred Chris O’Donnell, Bill Paxton, Robin Tunney and Scott Glenn. Anyone? Well, anyway, it was set on K2 (the world’s second highest mountain).

    K2, also known officially as Mount Godwin-Austen or Chhogori, has a summit 8,611 metres above sea level. It is located on the border between China and Pakistan. The Chinese side of the mountain is widely considered to be the more difficult and hazardous side, so the summit is usually attempted from the Pakistan side.

    Behind Annapurna, K2 has the second highest fatality rate of any mountain with a height over 8,000 metres. Approximately speaking, there’s one death for every four successful climbs; justifying its nickname as the “Savage Mountain.” Unlike with the other 8,000 metre peaks, nobody has ever successfully ascended K2 in winter.

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  4. Makalu

    With an elevation of 8,485m, Makalu is officially the fifth highest mountain in the world. Situated 19km southeast of Everest, on the border between Nepal and China, Makalu is notable for its summit’s iconic pyramid shape. Makalu was first summited in 1955 by Lionel Terray and Jean Couzy, who made up part of a French expedition.

    Because of the mountain’s isolated position, which leaves it exposed to the elements, and numerous knife-edge ridges and pant-filling steep sections, Makalu is viewed by many in the mountaineering community as one of the world’s most difficult climbs. The latter stages of the ascent, in particular, involve some extremely technical rock and ice climbing.

  5. Manaslu


    Coming in at number eight on the list of the all-time highest mountains is Manaslu. Manaslu can be found in the west-central part of Nepal, and has a summit that’s situated 8,163m above sea level.

    The first successful ascent of Manaslu occurred in 1956, when Japanese climber Toshio Imanishi and Nepalese Sherpa Gyalzen Norbu made it to the summit.  The mountain, the highest one in the Gorkha District, is a significant part of Japan’s mountaineering history.

    In the same way that some Brits consider Everest to be their mountain, the Imanishi ascent and subsequent climbs by other Japanese adventurers has seen Japan claim Manaslu as their own.